• © Émeric Lhuisset L'Autre Rive, Iraq, Turkey, Greece, Germany, France, Denmark, Syria, 2010 - 2018

    © Émeric Lhuisset L'Autre Rive, Iraq, Turkey, Greece, Germany, France, Denmark, Syria, 2010 - 2018

  • © Harley Weir, Homes, 2016

    © Harley Weir, Homes, 2016

  • © Tereza Červeňová, Tomky, Borský Svätý Jur, Slovakia, August 2016 from the series June 2016-18

    © Tereza Červeňová, Tomky, Borský Svätý Jur, Slovakia, August 2016 from the series June 2016-18

First exhibitions announced for Brighton Photo Biennial 2018:
A New Europe

We've announced the first exhibitions for our photography festival exploring the UK’s current state of flux in the EU

Brighton Photo Biennial returns this autumn (28 September – 28 October 2018) with a month of free photography exhibitions and events across Brighton & Hove.

The Biennial is a Photoworks production and the theme for this, its eighth edition, is A New Europe. The festival will examine the current state of flux as the United Kingdom redefines its role in Europe, our shared history and photography’s role in the construction of national identity.

A New Europe draws on one of the most important geopolitical events of our time. Our status in the European Union may be changing, yet geographically the United Kingdom will remain part of Europe – with a shared history and intertwined future. The festival will explore these topics by incorporating work from key practitioners alongside emerging talents. Showing contemporary perspectives, much of this work has been produced by young artists and in response to current uncertainty.

Tereza Červeňová’s work charts the period since the referendum, while Émeric Lhuisset and Harley Weir’s projects focus on migration and the ongoing refugee crisis. New work by Donovan Wylie explores the geography of Britain as an island, simultaneously divided yet connected. The festival also looks back to the 1990s when the opening of The Channel Tunnel physically linked Britain to the continent for the first time in 12,000 years.

‘A New Europe provides a platform for discussion through exhibitions, workshops and public events’ explains Mavlian. ‘It will be a vehicle for conversation between artists and audiences and an opportunity to discuss our current state of flux.’

Taking place in established galleries, pop-ups and public spaces across the city, exhibitions will be free. A full programme announcement will be made later in the summer.


© Harley Weir, Homes, 2016

© Harley Weir, Homes, 2016

Harley Weir: Homes, 2016
Homes depicts photographs made in October 2016 in the migrant and refugee camps of Calais, known informally as the Jungle. Taken immediately before and during the clearing of this provisional settlement, Weir’s images highlight both the humanity and ingenuity of those living there – setting the domestic and familiar against a backdrop of displacement. Co-produced with Fabrica.


Émeric Lhuisset: Many Shades of Blue, 2017
In his first UK solo exhibition, Émeric Lhuisset traces the migration stories of different generations, inspired by his own grandmother who escaped to North Africa to flee conflict during the Second World War. Choosing to use one of photography’s oldest processes Lhuisset explains, ‘These photographs will be printed as cyanotypes and will not be fixed. They will evolve as the exhibit unfolds, and in the end will become blue monochromes… the blue of the sea in which so many vanish, but also the blue of Europe.’


Donovan Wylie: Lighthouse, 2017-18
By photographing singular lighthouses as seen from their opposite coastlines, Wylie presents the physical barriers created by the sea. Scotland is seen from Northern Ireland and Gris Nez from Dover. The images simultaneously represent closeness and distance, interrogating how the isolation of the British landscape contributes to understanding our current state.


© Tereza Červeňová, Tomky, Borský Svätý Jur, Slovakia, August 2016 from the series June 2016-18

© Tereza Červeňová, Tomky, Borský Svätý Jur, Slovakia, August 2016 from the series June, 2016-18

Tereza Červeňová: June, 2016-18
The title June refers to the month of the referendum and represents the perspective of a European artist who lives and works in the UK. Červeňová explains how ‘the meaning of home and plans for the future are shaken and are in limbo’.


Group Show: Cross Channel Photographic Mission
Photoworks began life in 1987 as the Cross Channel Photographic Mission, an organisation with a French counterpart and a joint mission to explore the landscape and communities affected by the construction of The Channel Tunnel. More than twenty five years on, this exhibition will focus on work and archival material related to the commissions made in France and will include over sixty pieces from Lewiz Baltz, Marilyn Bridges, Christian Courreges, Fabiana Figueiredo, Jean-Louis Garnell, Bruce Gilden, Josef Koudelka, Philippe Lesage, Bernard Plossu & Michel Butor. The exhibition has been curated by Inès de Bordas. In partnership with CRP/ Centre régional de la photographie Hauts-de-France.


A full programme announcement will be made later this summer.

View press release here

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